Gary Farney

Gary D. Farney

Primary Field
Archaeology
Individual Type
Associate Professor
http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu
Associate Professor of History, Rutgers University Archaeological Field School in Italy
Latest Updates
    PostedTuesday, October 27, 2020 at 2:22 PM
    Rutgers University Archaeological Field School in Italy (http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu">http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu) (July 4 to July 31, 2021). This is a Rutgers University Study Abroad summer program that endeavors to teach undergraduate and graduate students archaeological field skills and methods. At the end of the field school students earn either 6 or 3 Rutgers credits. For 2021, we will be working on the Roman-era villa site (ca. 100 BCE to 200 CE) near the village of Vacone, ca. 50 km north of Rome. For more information see our website (http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu) or contact Prof. Gary D. Farney (gfarney@rutgers.edu).
    Rutgers University Archaeological Field School in Italy (http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu">http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu) (July 4 to July 31, 2021). This is a Rutgers University Study Abroad summer program that endeavors to teach undergraduate and graduate students archaeological field skills and methods. At the end of the field school students earn either 6 or 3 Rutgers credits. For 2021, we will be working on the Roman-era villa site (ca. 100 BCE to 200 CE) near the village of Vacone, ca. 50 km north of Rome. For more information see our website (http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu) or contact Prof. Gary D. Farney (gfarney@rutgers.edu).
Biography

Gary D. Farney received his BA from Indiana University (double majoring in Classics and History) in 1991. While doing his graduate training at Bryn Mawr College (PhD 1999), he was a Rome Prize Winner in 1997 at the American Academy in Rome, and an Oscar Broneer Fellow at the American School for Classical Studies in Athens in 1998. He also received training at the American Numismatic Society in New York City (Summer Fellow 1994) and participated in three seasons of archaeological excavations at the Italian sites of Fregellae, Cosa and Fabrateria Nova.

Before coming to Rutgers, he was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics at Hollins University (1999-2000) and Assistant Professor of Classics at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (2000-2001). From 2005-2010, he directed the Rutgers Study Abroad Summer in Greece Program. Prof. Farney also received the Henry J. Browne Award for Teaching Excellence from Rutgers-Newark’s University College in 2006. He served as Chairperson for the Rutgers’ side of the Department of History (2010-2012, Spring 2014), and is currently the Director of the Program in Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (since 2008). In Spring 2013, he was a Senior Resident Fellow at the Research Center for Anatolian Civlizations in Istanbul, Turkey

Prof. Farney’s research and publishing interests have been in the areas of Roman Republican and early Imperial political culture, ancient ethnic identity and other group identity, and the material culture of ancient Italy. In addition to a number of articles, his first book project was Ethnic Identity and Aristocratic Competition in the Roman Republic published by Cambridge University Press in 2007 (for a review of this book, see http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2008/2008-04-25.html).

His current book-project is tentatively entitled Communicating Identity in Republican and Early Imperial Rome. In this he argues that each noble Roman family carried its own specific identity that it used while competing with other families in Rome’s highly competitive political culture. Families expressed this identity via symbols or emblems they wore on their person or put on coins they minted for the Roman state, in the physical appearance of individual family members through evocative costume, hair-styles and jewelry, and in public spectacles like games and funerals.

Prof. Farney is also the Editor-in-Chief of the ExternalJournal of Ancient History. Moreover, he  published a co-edited volume entitled The Peoples of Ancient Italy (De Gruyter Press, 2017) with Guy Bradley of Cardiff University (https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/204450).

Since 2012, Prof. Farney is co-director of an archaeological project in central Italy, the Upper Sabina Tiberina Project. Rutgers and non-Rutgers students (both undergraduate and graduate) may apply to participate in the Externalfield school in Italy that serves this project. The field school is currently one of the largest Rutgers faculty-led study abroad program in the university.

Read More Read Less