Adam Gordon

Adam D. Gordon

Primary Field
Biological Anthropology
Position
Associate Professor of Biological Anthropology
https://www.albany.edu/anthropology
Associate Professor of Biological Anthropology, SUNY, University at Albany, Department of Anthropology
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Knowledge / Expertise
Interest/Specialty Areas Primate evolutionary biology, hominin evolution
Biography

Dr. Adam Gordon is a biological anthropologist with interests in the evolution of size and shape in non-human primates, modern humans, and our fossil relatives. His work attempts to identify the relative importance of ecological and social selection pressures in producing the size and shape variation found in living primates at various levels of taxonomic scale, ranging from intrapopulation comparisons within subspecies to phylogenetic comparative analyses across the Order Primates. Dr. Gordon is particularly interested in identifying sex-specific responses to resource stress in primates, including fossil hominins.In addition, he is broadly interested in methodological questions related to analyzing variation in incomplete datasets such as those typically associated with fossil and zooarchaeological settings. He has also developed new techniques for comparative statistical analysis of hominin fossil and extant primate data.

For more on Dr. Gordon's research and teaching: https://www.albany.edu/~ag856732/

Two representative publications by Dr. Gordon include:

Gordon AD, Green DJ, Jungers WL, Richmond BG. 2020. Limb proportions and positional behavior: revisiting the theoretical and empirical underpinnings for locomotor reconstruction in Australopithecus africanus. In Zipfel B, Richmond BG, and Ward CV, eds.: Hominid Postcranial Remains from Sterkfontein, South Africa, 1936-1995. Advances in Human Evolution Series. Oxford University Press. pp. 321-334.

Gordon AD. 2013. Sexual size dimorphism in Australopithecus: current understanding and new directions. In Reed KE, Fleagle JG, and Leakey RE, eds.: The Paleobiology of Australopithecus. Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology Series. Springer. pp. 195-212.

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Geographic Areas of Expertise International
Sub-Saharan Africa
Madagascar
Organizations