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A fully searchable reference of anthropologists within universities, colleges, museums, non-profits, government agencies, and businesses. The online version of the AnthroGuide allows you to search for organizations by name, location, degrees offered, available internships, field schools, and more.

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    Uxeda, shared an update
    Posted16 hours and 40 minutes AGO

    Greetings all! Our website is now live! Check out the link in our profile. We specialize in data collection resources for social scientists and we're doing our formal launch at the AAA conference in Baltimore next month. We'll be adding content to our site progressively as we get closer to that date, and doing some fun activities at the conference, so stay tuned!

    https://www.uxeda.com/

    Greetings all! Our website is now live! Check out the link in our profile. We specialize in data collection resources for social scientists and we're doing our formal launch at the AAA conference in Baltimore next month. We'll be adding content to our site progressively as we get closer to that date, and doing some fun activities at the conference, so stay tuned!

    https://www.uxeda.com/

    PostedSaturday, August 7, 2021 at 1:49 AM
    Current Research I am writing two books. Both take up disruption in Tojol-ab'al Mayan villages. 1) The first describes how responses to a miracle that occurred in the village of Lomantán—a religious reflection of the Zapatista Uprising—tamped down conflicts associated with the Uprising by diverting resources to supporting to the miracle. When the miracle brought fame to Lomantán, it attracted money and labor from many Tojol-ab'al villages to create a pilgrimage site in Lomantán. The unusual cooperation among communities spared them much disorder. 2) The second book examines the cosmological underpinnings of agricultural practice in Tojol-ab'al communities and gives cosmological support to the 'vegetative metaphor' that is thought to govern Mayan ideas about the roles of humans in the cosmos. Festivals mark seasonal changes important to agricultural activity that ensures a proper harvest. The predictability of appropriate climate in seasons is now challenged by global warming.
    Current Research I am writing two books. Both take up disruption in Tojol-ab'al Mayan villages. 1) The first describes how responses to a miracle that occurred in the village of Lomantán—a religious reflection of the Zapatista Uprising—tamped down conflicts associated with the Uprising by diverting resources to supporting to the miracle. When the miracle brought fame to Lomantán, it attracted money and labor from many Tojol-ab'al villages to create a pilgrimage site in Lomantán. The unusual cooperation among communities spared them much disorder. 2) The second book examines the cosmological underpinnings of agricultural practice in Tojol-ab'al communities and gives cosmological support to the 'vegetative metaphor' that is thought to govern Mayan ideas about the roles of humans in the cosmos. Festivals mark seasonal changes important to agricultural activity that ensures a proper harvest. The predictability of appropriate climate in seasons is now challenged by global warming.
    PostedMonday, July 26, 2021 at 4:28 PM
    Cris Panella and I have edited the book, Norms and Illegality: Intimate Ethnographies and Politics (https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781793646316/Norms-and-Illegality-Intimate-Ethnographies-and-Politics), with contributions by Florence Babb, Isabella Clough Marinaro, Michael Herzfeld, Gordon Mathews, Lorelei Mendoza, Lynne Milgram, Alan Smart, Andrew Walsh, and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld. It explores liminal and illegal practices in relation to political control and cultural normativity. The contributors draw on years of ethnographic experiences in Greece, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Italy, Madagascar, Mali, Philippines, and Thailand to study the contradictions of what is legal and illegal. The contributors shed light on moral economies and frames of value entailed in systems of representation that have been set up by individuals who are deemed illegal, liminal, or deviant in their confrontations with the state.
    Cris Panella and I have edited the book, Norms and Illegality: Intimate Ethnographies and Politics (https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781793646316/Norms-and-Illegality-Intimate-Ethnographies-and-Politics), with contributions by Florence Babb, Isabella Clough Marinaro, Michael Herzfeld, Gordon Mathews, Lorelei Mendoza, Lynne Milgram, Alan Smart, Andrew Walsh, and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld. It explores liminal and illegal practices in relation to political control and cultural normativity. The contributors draw on years of ethnographic experiences in Greece, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Italy, Madagascar, Mali, Philippines, and Thailand to study the contradictions of what is legal and illegal. The contributors shed light on moral economies and frames of value entailed in systems of representation that have been set up by individuals who are deemed illegal, liminal, or deviant in their confrontations with the state.
    PostedTuesday, July 20, 2021 at 3:12 PM
    Congratulations to PhD student, Daniel Basil Hamilton, for receiving the Ruth Barber Moon award from CWRU’s School of Graduate Studies! This award is given to graduate students who demonstrate academic promise, leadership ability, and financial need. They were also awarded a Social Justice Institute Grant Fellowship for their project, “Multiple Ontologies in the Provision of Gender Affirming Care.” Congratulations!
    Congratulations to PhD student, Daniel Basil Hamilton, for receiving the Ruth Barber Moon award from CWRU’s School of Graduate Studies! This award is given to graduate students who demonstrate academic promise, leadership ability, and financial need. They were also awarded a Social Justice Institute Grant Fellowship for their project, “Multiple Ontologies in the Provision of Gender Affirming Care.” Congratulations!
    PostedTuesday, July 20, 2021 at 3:10 PM
    Congratulations to Anthropology PhD student, Jillian Schulte, on being awarded a Social Justice Institute Grant Fellowship for her summer project, “Healthcare Navigation & COVID-19 in Cleveland’s Bhutanese-Nepali Refugee Community.”
    Congratulations to Anthropology PhD student, Jillian Schulte, on being awarded a Social Justice Institute Grant Fellowship for her summer project, “Healthcare Navigation & COVID-19 in Cleveland’s Bhutanese-Nepali Refugee Community.”
    PostedTuesday, July 20, 2021 at 3:09 PM
    Congratulations to 2021 CWRU PhDs: Kelley Kampman, Maureen Floriano, Raakhee Patel, Christine Bordern-King-Jones!
    Congratulations to 2021 CWRU PhDs: Kelley Kampman, Maureen Floriano, Raakhee Patel, Christine Bordern-King-Jones!
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